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  1. #1
    Senior Member
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    Crossbow tips - shooting and hunting

    A few tips on shooting and hunting with a crossbow. Feel free to add to them..

    Read all manufacture literature that comes with your crossbow and follow the instructions. If a DVD is provided watch it intently before assembling or shooting your bow.

    Use a rope cocking aid or mechanical cocking device. You will get better accuracy and its a whole lot easier on your fingers. You'll practice more if you use a cocking device

    Select a good target with adequate sized back stop. Crossbows are extremely fast and powerful. They can and will shoot through a lot of targets. Stay focused of your surroundings and what is behind your target. Keep a watchful eye on children , pets , vehicles, buildings and the like.

    Select and use the proper arrows that are recommended by the manufacture. To low of a weight will create a dry fire condition.

    Do Not Dry Fire Your Crossbow.

    It is recommended by the National Bowhunter Education Foundation that you do not attempt to cock your crossbow while in a elevated platform. It is way too easy to loose your balance and fall and there is no deer or turkey worth injury trying to get a second shot. Always wear a fall restraint device ...no matter what weapon your using.

    Keep all thumbs and fingers below the rail while shooting. This is serious and probably one of the common injuries for crossbow users. A 150# or larger will feel no resistance as it tears through a finger or thumb.

    Regularly go over your crossbow and check for loose screws , bolts and the like. Replace frayed strings and cables as necessary or by the manufactures recommendation . Keep your equipment in good working order.

    Check to make sure limbs are "clear" of any tree limbs, trunk of the tree or obstacles before pulling trigger.

    After cocking bow, always set the safety (if bow does not set automatically).

    Learn your shooting limits, and stay within them.

    At final assembly, use clear fingernail polish (or blue Loc-tite) on all screws to prevent loosening from vibration and shock.

    Always remove your arrow from your crossbow when climbing in and out of your tree stand.

    Take along a field tipped arrow to uncock your crossbow.

    It's always good to practice with field points but be very sure to practice with the bolt/broadhead combination you're going to hunt with. Even if the broadheads you choose are known to have the same POI as field points.

    Spin test your hunting arrow/broadhead set-up to make sure your bolts/broadheads are straight.

    Concentrate on your target and squeeze the trigger, don't pull/slap it as it will cause the bow to jerk. Follow through with your shots, try to watch your arrow’s flight until you hear the bolt hit the target.

    FOLLOW THROUGH IS VERY IMPORTANT FOR ACCURACY..

    " Aim small, miss small " or Pick a spot. Even if you do have a scope. Don’t aim at the entire animal , imagine a small target in the vital areas and smoothly squeeze the trigger.
    Shot for an exit hole that will traverse both lungs if at all possible..

    While hunting, periodically check to make sure your arrow is all the way back in your bow.
    If it moves just a fraction of an inch it could cause a dry fire situation.

    If hunting from a treestand, always cock the crossbow on the ground before climbing into stand. Do NOT put an arrow in it until you are settled in the stand.

    Mark your serving with white paint on each side of the rail as close to the rail as possible. If the crossbow is cocked crooked you can tell at a glance..

    Never raise or lower a cocked crossbow from a treestand with an arrow in it.

    Watch how far you put your foot in the stirrup before cocking the crossbow, if it is not in deep enough (or a bit muddy ) and it slips off your foot WHAM sore mouth or missing teeth.

    A sling on a crossbow is a benefit not just for carrying, but also to steady your bow while shooting. Wrap the sling around your forearm of teh arm that you use to hold the forearm of the crossbow and push out. This will help tremendously in steadying the crossbow for a shot.

    Lightly tap your scope after you make an adjustment that you will have a more true setting when you shoot, as you will pre-set the reticule, and zero is less likely to change due to the jarring of a shot or transportation.

    It is best to wax your string every 20-25 shots and to rub the wax in with a small piece of leather. It is also a benefit to keep your rail clear, scrape off excess wax with a credit card. A wax build up will create friction and have a minor effect on speed, a lot of guys swear by rail lube but the rail gets well lubricated by the string wax.

    Again, follow the manufacturers recommendations on lubricating the rail.

  2. #2
    Administrator Randy's Avatar
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    RE: Crossbow tips - shooting and hunting

    Those are some good tips Woody.
    Anybody else have any to add?
    Randy
    Randy Wood
    Director of Customer Experience
    TenPoint Crossbow Technologies

  3. #3

    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Northwest Ohio
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    32

    Re: Crossbow tips - shooting and hunting

    Periodically check the tightness on bolts and screws. Verify that your crossbow is still sighted in, preferably the day before or even the day of the hunt if you can. I failed to do either on one hunt and it cost me a missed shot on an 8 point. The scope mount was loose.

  4. #4
    imported_Barb
    Guest

    Re: Crossbow tips - shooting and hunting

    Great list Woody, but.....

    One change in the recommendations: Don't use blue lock-tite on our crossbows! I understand screws can back out, but I also know the problems associated with blue lock-tite when crossbows hit my warranty department. If you must use lock-tite - USE PURPLE LOCK-TITE. The purple lock-tite will keep the screws in place, but it will break free when we try taking the crossbow apart.

    Also, no lock-tite of any color should be used in the trigger box - it's possibly a trigger re-build, or worse a new trigger box altogether.

    Barb

  5. #5

    Join Date
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    S.W. Ohio - Springboro
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    562

    RE: Crossbow tips - shooting and hunting

    Good stuff...

    My most common tips would be to make sure to practice more than you "think" you should. Crossbows may be easier to become proficient with, but like anything else, they REQUIRE adequate time to become a master with. Being completely comfortable and not having to put too much thought into shot execution is imperative to become a good hunter with whatever means you choose. I am a big believer in recreating situational shooting. I practice as much from elevation as I do from the ground. I will either shoot from the top of my garage (which is 18 ft. up) or a ladder stand that I have set up in my side yard. I also set up a ground blind and shoot from a foldable seat with my SteddyEddy planted on the ground. I generally know the distances where my opportunities are so I put the most time in there, but I don't ignore the odd angles, weird distances or awkward shooting positions. Do add time to keep the bow maintained as mentioned above, but that should be a given, not the exception I so often see.

    Secondly, use the advantages of a crossbow to your advantage. Hunt from stands with a shooting rail or equip the bow with a SteddyEddy. The point is to have the bow comfortably ready in front of you and not have to stand or reach around for the bow as a deer is approaching. SIT STILL! If you can, move in quarter inch increments until you either get the shot or the deer's head is obstructed to where you can move more rapidly.

    A little more on the moment of truth: Looking through a scope promotes tunnel vision. Don't allow yourself to become oblivious to everything else. You need to maintain a broad vision until the time to make the shot on a specific point. I too use the "aim small, miss small" mentality but not until the final moment. Until then I am looking for the right shooting corridor that intersects the deer's path as well as other deer that may give away my position. You also have to come out of the narrow focus quickly so that you can discern the injury, direction and last know location of the deer.

    Lastly, take the "first-best" shot you have. Going back to being practiced and comfortable, you need to know what you are capable of and be ready to apply that capability at a moment's notice. Patience is important, you must be diligent and make sure the distance, angle and shooting corridor are all available. I know lots of folks though who don't end up with a harvest because they were "waiting for a better shot" when that shot was right after they first saw the deer. I myself have been guilty of letting the best shot pass by and then not getting any other chance. I did this alot when I was first starting out. My papaw caught on to my propensity for this at an early age. His words echo in my ears on most hunts; "You ain't gonna kill nothin' boy if you don't throw some lead". He was the first person to restrain himself and as a marine corp match shooter and marksman always seemed to hit what he was aiming for. He knew I was well practiced and would be able to make the shot if I would just take it, so for me at that time it was the right thing to say.

    I'll repeat it in summary: "To be consistantly successful, you must be ready to make a quality shot through practice, appropriate patience and an intelligent approach to crossbow hunting."

    There are lots of other subjects relating to how to get close enough for the shot, but I must save that for another day or maybe a book. :)
    Brad
    - \"Luck is when opportunity meets preparation.\"

  6. #6

    Join Date
    Nov 2006
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    South Central Texas
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    Re: Crossbow tips - shooting and hunting

    thanks for the idea's and tips - one thing I really like about this site is how everyone tries to help each other - alot of good ya'll
    HAL

  7. #7
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    First time poster. Great site! I just bought a Titan Xtreme. I feel stupid for asking this but I want to make sure I don't injure myself or mess up the crossbow. I ordered my crossbow online and it came with a rope cocking device. It was not the acudraw50 that Ten Point offers on their bow but a loose aftermarket rope cocking device. I think it is by Xcalibur believe it or not. My question is, I see on most videos that they have a groove on other crossbows to put the rope on (usually behind scope mount or cutout above thumbhole on stock) before hooking to the bow's string. I do not see this on my Titan Xtreme. What is the proper way to use this type of rope cocking device? Please be specific as I know as much about crossbows as I do about bass fishing-nothing! TIA!!!
    Last edited by lsubowhunter; 10-25-2015 at 08:09 PM.

  8. #8
    Senior Member allchokedup's Avatar
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    Tennessee
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    Here you go. Works the same with your rope cocker.
    Check out the Acurope too...its awesome to use. I have one and use it for backup if for some reason my Acudraw fails.

    http://www.tenpointcrossbows.com/vid...nt-acurope-12/



    Quote Originally Posted by lsubowhunter View Post
    First time poster. Great site! I just bought a Titan Xtreme. I feel stupid for asking this but I want to make sure I don't injure myself or mess up the crossbow. I ordered my crossbow online and it came with a rope cocking device. It was not the acudraw50 that Ten Point offers on their bow but a loose aftermarket rope cocking device. I think it is by Xcalibur believe it or not. My question is, I see on most videos that they have a groove on other crossbows to put the rope on (usually behind scope mount or cutout above thumbhole on stock) before hooking to the bow's string. I do not see this on my Titan Xtreme. What is the proper way to use this type of rope cocking device? Please be specific as I know as much about crossbows as I do about bass fishing-nothing! TIA!!!
    Last edited by allchokedup; 10-26-2015 at 08:37 AM.
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  9. #9
    Junior Member
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    Oct 2015
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    Thanks!! Exactly what I was looking for!!!!

  10. #10
    Great write up and tips, thanks a lot.
    Crossbow Enthusiast. My WIP site - Elystuff

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